Thread Theory

Welcome to the new era of menswear sewing. Go ahead and create something exceptional!


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Guest Sew-Along Post: How to Save Fabric When Cutting Out the Jedediah Pants

Meg, of Made By Meg was one of the test sewers for our Jedediah Pants pattern.  She was the sewer who produced this spectacular pair of denim pants (with musical themed pocket linings!):

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Not only is she a thorough and enthusiastic test sewer for us, she has also agreed to write a guest blog post to show you how she improved upon our cutting layouts…and saved a bunch of fabric!  Thank you, Meg, for taking the time to do this!  Without further ado, here is Meg’s very helpful tutorial to save you fabric when cutting out your pants or shorts for the sew-along!:

It’s no secret that I don’t always follow the rules, and this holds true for the Jedediah Pants
Testing the pattern for the fabulous Thread Theory, I made sure to follow most of the instructions: I carefully flat felled my seams, cut with the grain, and even followed the exquisite directions to french seam the pockets – and I was glad I did! But there was one area where I differed from protocol: the cutting layout. When I got the A-OK from Thread Theory, I figured I’d share it with you! So, here is an alternate suggestion for a cutting layout:

A bit of background: While it is usually wise to follow pattern instructions (ask me how I know!), cutting layout is one area where you can sometimes take a bit of liberty. For one, manufacturers often have to do a one-size-fits-all approach to the cutting layout, and your smaller or larger pattern pieces may work in a few different ways than suggested. On the user side, you may have to make adjustments for different fabric widths, a directional print, or even need to make do with just barely enough fabric. This is where it may be a good idea to experiment with a few different layouts before cutting.

The Jedediah layout: For the Jedediah Pants, the cutting layout places one pant leg above the other, with the waistband running vertically next to the pant leg (illustration below). While this works great to make sure that the pattern pieces in any size will fit on your fabric, it takes up a lot of yardage (3 yards at least)! Furthermore, if your fabric has a one-way print such as pinstripes, a one-way print such as a plaid, or even a 2-way stretch, a vertically cut waistband will not face the same way as the rest of your pants.

Cutting Layout

The modifications: To save fabric and make sure my waistband stretched in the same direction as the rest of the pants (I used a fabric with 5-10% stretch), I rearranged my pattern pieces, squeezing them on to under 2 yards of fabric! Here’s what the new layout looks like, based on how I cut K’s pants (left) and what that line drawing might look like (right):

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In order to make the waistband modification, I cut the the waistband along the fold of the fabric. As shown above (bottom right-hand corner), half the waistband is placed along the folded edge of the fabric. When the fabric is cut and unfolded, you’ll have a full-size waistband facing the same direction as the rest of your pants! Now my waistband will better match the rest of the pants.

You might call me a slacker, but I just love little sewing shortcuts that save me some fabric space!

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Meg’s Musical Pants

The third test sewer for the Jedediah Pants, Meg of Made by Meg, has posted about her finished pants over at her blog – and she’s hosting a giveaway!  If you would like a chance to receive a free copy of the Jedediah pants, go to her blog post and leave a comment…and while you’re at it, check out all her great photos and a review of the pattern.

Meg’s pants look excellent on her boyfriend and she has some adjustments planned for her next versions to make them even more custom.  I love how she has personalized this pair by adding musical instrument themed pocket lining.  She very thoughtfully placed the lining so that the instruments face the wearer when they are putting them on rather than being hidden inside the pockets.

So… Meg has created secretly musical pants and I’ve been adding vintage handkerchiefs as binding to my versions (the insides remind me of a summer picnic when they’re finished!)…what custom touches will you add to your Jedediah shorts?


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Moving Week

This week Thread Theory Designs Inc. moved across the city to join us in a new home just begging to be decorated!  I’ve compiled a Pinterest gallery of drool-worthy sewing rooms that I hope to glean ideas from for the new office/sewing space.

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Meg of Made By Meg’s prettily framed sewing samples.

Meg, over at Made By Meg has come up with a great way of displaying sewing samples.  I’ve compiled a huge binder of them over the last year of construction classes so am contemplating putting the ones I use most up on my wall in a similar manner.  Meg’s space looks so pretty and personalized!

Tasia, of the indie pattern company Sewaholic, has made great use of Ikea’s Expedit cabinet.  I love how her patterns fit so perfectly in them…I can’t wait until the day when I can have an Expedit of my own filled with prettily packaged Thread Theory patterns!

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Tasia of Sewaholic’s organized Expedit.

 

Aside from moving and unpacking since last Friday, we have been busy refreshing various websites in eager anticipation of new comments about Thread Theory Designs Inc…we’re both a little giddy with the unexpected and sudden attention our company has received in the sewing world of late!  Thank you to House of Pinheiro for featuring us in a blog post last Saturday (April 27th).  We were very excited this week by all the views generated for our pattern store stemming from their blog post!

House of Pinheiro screenshot

Also, we found Thread Theory mentioned on Pattern Review…we’re so glad that news is spreading like wild fire across the sewing corner of the internet just in time for the Newcastle Cardigan pattern release on May 15th!

Pattern Review Screen Shot

 

Do you have any sewing room decor or organizing tips to share?  I can’t wait to get my room in ship-shape!


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Pattern Review by Meg

This week, over at Made By Meg, Meg posted a great review of our Newcastle Cardigan pattern.  She was a speedy and wonderfully thorough test sewer for us and her results are fantastic (and her boyfriend makes a great model!).  She used a lightweight sweater knit and faux leather vinyl to create the classic “hard and soft” menswear look.

We’re excited that she enjoyed sewing up the cardigan and noticed the effort we put into creating easy-to-follow instructions.  She also told us that she was glad we had minimized the amount of paper that the cardigan pattern prints out on as paper usage can often be quite huge with PDF patterns…Matt is thrilled she noticed as getting the pattern down to only 24 pages took hours of work!

Thank you Meg for testing our pattern!  Check out Meg’s blog for all sorts of interesting reading and great project pictures…also, be sure to check in on May 15th when she will be offering a give-away to celebrate the launch of our Newcastle Cardigan!