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Welcome to the new era of menswear sewing. Go ahead and create something exceptional!


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In the Wild: Sunday Breakfast Strathcona

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I have a Strathcona Henley to show you this week!  This professional looking Henley was sewn by Jane of Jane’s Sew & Tell for her husband.  The Strath looks great in a cheerful red and was perfect for a (delicious looking!) Sunday breakfast.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To see more photos and hear about the sewing process, head on over to Jane’s blog!  I think this Henley will be a great piece to transition into Fall (my mind is on a Fall wardrobe at the moment).  What garments and patterns are on your Fall sewing list?  If the Finlayson Sweater is on it, head on over to our store because it’s 25% off right now :).  Enter SEWSWEATERS as a discount code upon checkout.


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Girl Charlee giveaway WINNER!

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Wow, I’ve been completely overwhelmed by how many of you have shared all your sewing and fabric shopping plans as part of the Girl Charlee gift card giveaway!  So many of you mentioned Girl Charlee fabrics I hadn’t noticed yet (the Vintage Motorcycle knit is AWESOME!) and your ideas for combining prints and solids as well as for using more subtle prints for our Strathcona Henley and Comox Trunks patterns were really inspiring.  Thank you, everyone, for entering the draw!

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I used a random number generator from RANDOM.ORG to come up with the winner.  There were 97 posts (not including extra posts by the same people or any of my responses) and the generator chose post 79.  I counted from the oldest entry towards the newest.

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Now I will reveal the lucky winner!  DRUMROLL PLEASE….

Lisa said:

Henley! I love your patterns and I can’t wait to make some for my husband.

I hope your Henley turns out amazing, Lisa!  I’ll be emailing you momentarily.  Thanks, Girl Charlee, for providing the gift card – I am sure Lisa will have no problem finding the perfect fabric to suit her husband.


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Britex Strathcona Henley Tutorial

Happy Friday everyone!  We’re really excited by the response we’ve received about our new free Arrowsmith Undershirt!  I can’t wait to see what all you downloaders sew up with the pattern!

Today I have a tutorial to help you through our Strathcona Henley placket.  Not long ago I was offered a spot as a Britex Guest Blogger.  Have you shopped for fabric at Britex before?  They have a huge brick and mortar store in San Fransisco and an extremely well organized and frequently updated online store.  Their selection of knits is quite large and includes some really unique medium weights and tissue knits that I know I would never find at any of my local fabric stores.  They also have BEAUTIFUL selection of wools (and a great selection of plaids!) that I really look forward to sampling for the Goldstream Peacoat in the future!

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As a guest blogger on the Britex blog, I will be contributing blog posts that include tutorials using Britex fabrics.  I will likely focus on menswear (since that is where my main interest lies!) but will include some of the projects I make for myself or maybe even for our houme in future posts.

Head on over to the Britex blog to see all the other great guest posts (there are loads of really well photographed tutorials!) and read on her or on the Britex blog to see what I contributed for my first post:

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For my first tutorial using Britex Fabrics, I have selected the sumptuous Midweight Tweedy Fern & Taupe Wool Blend Knit in order to make a Strathcona Henley for Matt and to show you how to sew the Henley placket.  This fabric is wonderfully unusual – I know I wouldn’t find anything of this weight and gorgeous texture, let alone with a lovely wool content, at any of my local fabric shops!

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Since this fabric is of medium weight, I decided to sew the Henley placket using a lighter scrap of contrast cotton knit that I had left over from a past project.  I opted to sew the placket using the most fool-proof manner possible – hand sewing!

Even though I love sewing with knits (especially since I know that any knit garment will become a staple in my closet!), I am often filled with trepidation when a design requires me to sew something small or detailed with a knit, such as the Henley placket.  In order to avoid the worry of nicking and unravelling my knit fabric while unpicking crooked topstitching, I simply hand stitch any small details and enjoy the relaxing few extra worry-free minutes that this takes!

To begin the placket, you will first need to prepare the fabric piece by ironing a selection of folds.  These folds will provide you with a guide to apply the interfacing and will later help you fold your placket correctly when it has been attached to the Henley front.  Here are a series of photos to walk you through these steps:

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Now you can open up your folded fabric to see your ironed guidelines.

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Using the ironed guidelines, apply 1” strips of interfacing to the areas either side of the center section.  You may need to re-press your guidelines after applying your interfacing. Then, fold the entire placket in half and press just along the fold to create the center line that you see in the photo below.  This center crease will act as a guide for you to cut along later.

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On your Henley front, you will have marked the “Placket Placement Line.”  Make sure you are working on the WRONG side of your garment.  This is very important, because if you attach your placket to the right side of the shirt front, your placket will end up backwards later on!

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Pin the placket’s center crease to this marked line.  Also, place a pin or mark with chalk the future bottom of the placket.  The bottom is indicated by the notches on the left and right of the placket.

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Now you can sew along the creased lines either side of the center and across the bottom to create a squared off “U” shape.  Cut along the center line through both layers of fabric until approximately 1” from your bottom stitching.  At this point, clip outwards to each corner as pictured below.  Clip quite close to your stitching but be careful not to actually clip over it!

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Now trim the fabric flaps to 1/8”-1/4” to reduce the bulk.

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And you are ready to start folding and sewing!  Push the entire placket through the opening you just created and flip the shirt around so you are now looking at the right side of the shirt.  Fold along the creased fold lines so that each side of the placket is sandwiching the trimmed seam allowances.  Pin the right front placket (if you were wearing the shirt) and sew it in place using tiny, invisible stitches from top until bottom (the bottom is where the notches and your stitching are, not the bottom of the placket fabric).  Alternatively, you could topstitch 1/8” from the placket edge using your machine.

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Before sewing the left placket, you will need to prepare the bottom of the fabric.  Tidy up the loose fabric at the bottom so it becomes a series of 1” folds.

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Trim all but the top two layers to within ½” from your bottom stitching.  This will reduce the bulk at the bottom of your placket.

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Fold the bottom fabric under squarely and pin in place.  Now it is time to hand sew the left side of the placket!

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Continue sewing around the bottom of the placket until all edges are secure.  Press your placket really thoroughly at this point to make sure that the shirt is sitting nicely without any pulling or puckers.

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For this next step, you could skip all the hand stitching and move directly to finishing the bottom of your placket with topstitching, but you’ll probably notice there are still a lot of areas on the underside of the placket where fabric could shift around and get caught out of place when topstitching.  It’s super quick and easy to just do a few hand stitches to ensure everything stays where it should.  First, turn the garment over so you’re looking at the wrong side of the Henley front.  Tuck the bottom of the placket into the ‘pocket’ made by your previous hand stitching.

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Stitch where you just tucked so that the fabric can’t sneak out again!

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You can also open up the placket as pictured below and make a few stitches to join the left and right plackets pieces together across the bottom.

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Now, the last step is some very visible topstitching which I invariably fail to make perfectly square!  It is possible to stitch a perfect square and cross-lines if you are more precise with your machine stitching than I am, but if you are like me, just embrace the rustic manliness your slightly un-square topstitched square gives your Henley!  Once snaps or buttons are applied and the rest of the garment is sewn, it will blend in nicely.

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The rest of the Henley is a breeze after this and takes me about an hour to finish from this point!  And voila, Matt has a new sweater to wear for spring hikes and around the campfire (because, in my opinion, these are the perfect sorts of situations to wear an earthy and rugged wool Henley)!

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Spring Sewing Inspiration – Planning a project?

Are you planning a sewing project right now?  I’ve compiled a few different sources of great inspiration if you are planning to sew up a spring Newcastle Cardigan or Goldstream Peacoat.

I find spring is the best season of inspiration for me (as it is for many, I am sure, since it is a season of renewal and fresh starts).  The sun has come out here and there over the last week and there are daffodils just about to bloom under the cherry tree in our front yard!  Yet…as I speak I am currently huddled up inside with a cup of coffee instead of out rowing this morning (my Mom and I are on a dragon boat team) because it is rainy and windy today!  Needless to say, spring can be difficult season to dress for.

I think the Goldstream Peacoat and Newcastle Cardigan are excellent designs to manipulate into spring layering pieces so that the men wearing them are prepared for sudden rainstorms and to shed layers when the some comes out.  Here is a post full of proof of this and inspiration for you!

A couple days ago, MainlyDad (who happens to be sewing the Jedediah Pants at the moment) kindly sent me a link to an excellent article with MANY photos and an excellent write-up explaining why a shawl collar cardigan is the “essential spring layering piece” – if you are planning to sew a Newcastle Cardigan, this article will have you more than sufficiently inspired!  Just take a look at some of these gorgeous examples:

sncardi(Images sourced from: http://www.fashionbeans.com/2014/essential-spring-layering-piece-the-shawl-neck-cardigan/)

I really like how the cardigans have been styled as both middle layers and top layers and are displayed as both casual and dressy.

I’ve compiled some of your cardigans on our new Thread Theory Pinterest boards.  Have a look to see how the sewing community styles the shawl collar sweater!

The Goldstream Peacoat can also by sewn for spring by using a lighter wool or alternative fabric choice.  Have you seen these Spring-ready Goldstreams popping up around the sewing community?  This denim version is a really interesting and unique spin on a peacoat:

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And a light colour wool makes this a great early spring peacoat – nice and warm but not at all dark and wintery in appearance:

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Here are some sources of styling inspiration for you if you are planning to sew up a Goldstream in the near future:

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It is quite common to see shorter peacoats like the one above as spring attire.  It would be easy to achieve this look using the Goldstream Peacoat simply by slashing and overlapping the main body, facing and lining pattern pieces along the “Lengthen and Shorten Here” line.

And here are two gorgeous bits of additional proof that a spring peacoat really doesn’t need to be made in wool:

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Now lets finish off this inspiration post with the Strathcona Henley and my absolute favourite version I have seen yet!  Check out Brittany’s wonderfully relaxed henley:

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Brittany opens her blog post: “I love a man in a Henley.  Seriously, aren’t they sexy? Am I all alone in this?” Nope, you certainly aren’t alone!  I couldn’t agree more. 🙂

Are you inspired now?  Do you have some more sources of inspiration for Spring menswear to add to the conversation?  If so, comment with a link below!


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What everyone else has been sewing:

This morning I’ve been busily linking away so that I can show you some of the great things currently happening around the world that involve our sewing patterns.  It’s so rewarding to see what our patterns have inspired.  Matt and I may not have time for an in depth sew-along for every single pattern (though, we do have more planned, don’t worry!), or to sew up the millions of different cardigan’s, pants and henleys I have swirling around in my head, but that is okay because there are many other people out there who are doing exactly those things!

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If you are a Spanish speaker then you really are in luck – our Spanish stockist, Telaria, is mid-way through a thorough and easy-to-follow sew-along for the Newcastle Cardigan pattern!  Even if you don’t speak Spanish, you might want to make use of Google Translate and have a look at all the hard work Miren has put into documenting her Newcastle Cardigan sewing process.  We are thrilled that she has taken this large project up and love how her cardigan turned out.

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Once you’ve had a look at the Telaria “Just for Men” sew-along, make sure to add your Newcastle to the Flickr group that Miren has set up!  If you enter your photo by March 17th you will be entered in the draw for a chance to win one of three awesomely manly prizes (including manly fabric, a Japanese menswear pattern book and even some of our patterns).  Even though you missed the beginning of the Newcastle Cardigan portion of the sew along, you still have time to get ready for the third segment of the “Just for Men” series.  The Strathcona Henley sew-along will begin on March 3rd.  If you are nervous about sewing with knits, this will be an invaluable resource for you!

The next thing I want to share with you is a brand new blog called Tinker, Tailor, Sewster…Spy? created by a male sewer based out of Brisbane, Australia.  He began his blog to document his Jedediah Pant sewing process and also has plans in the works to sew up the rest of our Parkland Collection.  He is a very careful and thorough sewer who seems to have an endless pool or patience to pull from.  His most recent blog post details his decision to scrap his original plan to use bright blue top stitching (pictured below) and instead switch to gray.  This means he will be redoing the back pockets that he embroidered, blogged about and even filmed!

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I really admire his commitment to making the perfect garment.  After all, why put all that effort into sewing if you are only going to produce something that you aren’t really happy with?  To me, this is one of the most rewarding parts of sewing menswear.  Since menswear is dictated by details and fit, imperfection in either of these areas will stand out very obviously in a finished garment.  While it might be incredibly frustrating mid-sewing process to re-do top stitching over and over again or to make multiple mock-ups, the result is something that is very easy to feel proud about!

You would never guess that the author of Tinker, Tailor, Sewster…Spy?  is new to blogging – his posts are full of information, inspiration, lots of photos and videos.  Head on over to comment, follow his blog and encourage him in his new blogging endeavor.  It is great to see another male sewer join the sewing and blogging community!  Good luck to him on his quest for the perfect Jedediah Pants!

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Last but certainly not lease in today’s parade is a new project from the most prolific Thread Theory customer: Huff Makes Stuff.  I can’t believe how many Jeds and Straths Jen has whipped up over the last few months!  Her goal is to create a new outfit for her husband and herself each month for 12 months.  She has already completed four outfits for her husband which include four Jedediah Short and Pant variations and four Strathcona Henley, Sweater and T-shirt variations.  I love how her husband’s taste for colour and print is displayed in each outfit and I especially love how all of these garments display how versatile these two patterns are.  Each outfit looks well planned and stylish and must make Darron’s wardrobe very easy to pick from each morning!

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The latest outfit is wonderfully summery and bright and makes a nice Australian contrast to the dark mid-winter renditions of the patterns that I always sew.  She has mixed and matched the Strathcona variations to create a short sleeve henley without buttons.  She is toying with the idea of adding buttons to the placket but I think she should leave them off because I love how casual and cool it looks – perfect for a day at the beach or on the backyard patio!  She has paired this orange henley with awesomely out-there postage stamp Jedediah Shorts.  Her husband is fearless when it comes to prints (Matt has something to learn from him – he even steers clear of stripes!).  She made the legs slightly less tapered and did not cuff this version of the shorts.  Check out all of her outfits (both those sewn for her husband and those she’s sewn for herself) to see how rewarding an organized outfit-oriented approach to sewing can be!

Do you have any menswear projects, blog posts or tutorials to share with us?  We would love to feature them on the blog!  Send us an email at info@threadtheory.ca to let us know what you have been working on.


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Finished Garment Eye Candy!

First of all, thank you everyone for your overwhelmingly enthusiastic response to our call for peacoat test sewers!  We have selected our group of test sewers after a lot of deliberation.  It was so difficult to choose from all the detailed emails and comments we received!  Even if we didn’t select you this time, that didn’t mean you won’t have a chance to test sew in the future as we added everyone how applied to our test sewing mailing list!

Now, moving forward, did you notice the changes we made to the photos on our website this week?  Check them out! We added a new version of the Strathcona Henley and decided to feature the beautiful Jedediah Pants that my mother-in-law sewed up.

It was my dad’s birthday last weekend so I sewed him a Strathcona Henley as per his request.  This time, I chose a beautifully soft cotton knit with hardly any ribbing and a fairly stable jersey for the placket.  The sewing process was so much easier than it was with the heavily ribbed knit I had used for Matt’s henley because both my serger and sewing machine decided they agreed with my fabric choice!  We’ve updated the website photos to show my dad skillfully modelling his new shirt.  He’s become quite a pro; we quickly walked to the park and he matter-of-factly began to strike poses…even though there were kids and parents watching at the play ground!  Who would of thought my dad would be our easiest model!

While we were on a roll we also photographed the cardigan that my Mom had sewn my dad when we were in the pattern testing phase with the Newcastle Cardigan last spring.  Even though the cardigan has been worn by everyone from my school’s fashion show model to my grandpa when he’s visiting and chilly the cardigan has never been properly photographed.  My mom did an excellent job on it using a heavy (and thus difficult to handle) sweatshirt fleece and gorgeous leather details.  She even added leather elbow patches which make the cardigan look so sophisticated!  My dad loves wearing it when he walks their dog, Jake, now that it is getting pretty cold in the evenings.  As you can see, it looks really nice on him!

Last but not least, I have another excellent version of the Newcastle to show you.  Diana sewed this version and included a couple top stitching and fit modifications.  She added a strip of fabric at the side seam to increase the width of the body and I think that the extra seam lines create a really nice structured look.  The fabric and buttons she chose are just perfect and the tag she stitched in using a contrast thread makes the cardigan look like it has just been purchased from a high end menswear boutique!   Great job Diana and thanks for sharing your photos with us!

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I hope everyone had a fun Halloween!  Matt and I are really excited that it is now November…we have a lot of big things planned for Thread Theory this month!  


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The Parade – some of your finished garments!

Today I’ve compiled a few of the really outstanding finished (and in progress) garments that have been popping up in the last couple weeks.

I was going to post a parade of finished pants and shorts yesterday as a finale for the sew-along but I thought it might be better to wait until the end of the Kollabora Jedediah Shorts Sew-Along contest as I know there are a quite a few of you still steadily working away on your versions.

Instead, here is a smattering of inspirational projects covering the whole range of our patterns (all three, anyways! I guess that might be too few to properly describe our offerings as ‘a range’…but we have more patterns in the works so it won’t be too long until the selection grows again!).

First off, are Jana’s amazing Jedediah Shorts which she completed as the sew-along came to an end (a miraculous feat since her sewing machine was giving her no end of problems…you would never be able to tell from the beautiful stitching on her end result!).  I love the hand embroidery she placed on one of the back pockets!  After seeing it, Matt is wanting something similar on his next pair.

Jana used a black variegated linen for these with a great pop of yellow as contrast.  She added double top-stitching to the hem as per her boyfriend’s RTW pants and she customized the fit of the pattern by shaving off a bit of the width.  I hope these shorts will get lots of wear ; I bet the black linen will look really nice and comfortable as it ages – I love how linen does that!

Thanks for sharing these pictures Jana!  And thanks for following along and commenting on the sew-along; it was really fun to be working away on our shorts at the same time!

 

Next up is Layla’s Strathcona Henley!  She was one of our test sewer’s for our newest pattern and she wrote a great blog article about her experience over on her blog, The Old Fashioned Way.  Layla miraculously whipped this up on short notice after her email sneakily sorted our response confirming her as a test sewer into junk mail.  I think she is a sewing super-hero for completing this in time to give us her two-bits before the Strathcona Henley and T-shirt pattern launch.  There is nothing I hate more than sewing to a deadline…it’s the only time I ever seem to break needles as I sew!

 

The third gallery of photos on display are of Erin’s rendition of the Newcastle Cardigan.  Her blog post, complete with a funny story explaining how this first menswear project came to be realized, is over on her blog, Seamstress Erin.

We’ve had steady rain for the last week and suddenly I feel more like sewing with cozy wools and sweater knits again rather than linens and light cottons.  Erin’s version of the cardigan has really inspired me to sew up another version of my own (and this time, I actually mean MY own because I’m going to make a women’s version so that I don’t have to steal Matt’s anymore!).  I love the purple and black knit that she used – it’s drape really makes it look soft and cozy.  It pairs really well, I think, with the structured contrast shoulders and cuffs that she cut out of a heavy sweatshirt material.

She took some great photos – I especially like the cell-phone ‘action’ shot!  Thanks for sharing a link to your post on Facebook, Erin!  I am thrilled to have seen your version of the pattern! (And by the way, I love your anatomically correct heart embroidery pattern!  I don’t know how you find time for all your projects while working on your Ph.D. – very impressive!)

 

To finish off this parade, here are a few single shots that I’ve found around the internet.  Below, is an in-progress photo of Sarah’s cowboy pocket lining that she is using for her Jedediah Shorts – she’s uploaded the work in progress over on Kollabora so head on over to ‘heart’ her wonderfully whimsical fabric choice to give her a chance to win the Kollabora Jedediah Sew-Along contest!

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And last, but certainly not least is a Newcastle Cardigan sewn by a man for HIMSELF – this is the first finished version I have seen that has been sewn by a man – something that Matt and I really want to encourage through Thread Theory.  So we’re stoked to have seen this posted on Reddit!  I really love the contrast band that he added, it turns the Newcastle into more of a bomber jacket than a cardigan which, I think, really works well with the silhouette created by the shawl collar.  For someone who claims to not be very skilled at sewing yet, I think his results are SUPERB!

Im not that great at sewing yet, but I finally finished my Newcastle Cardigan. - Imgur

Thanks, everyone, for sharing photos of your projects!  Seeing happy sewists sew up versions of our patterns is the reason I continue to love running my own sewing pattern company – nothing makes me happier than encouraging people to sew!  If you have a photo of your work in progress or finished project made from one of our patterns, email us the photos at info@threadtheory.ca or send us a link to your blog post because we would love to add your photos to one of our blog posts or slide shows!


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Launch Day: The Strathcona Henley and T-Shirt

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Today we have released the third pattern in our Parkland Collection!  Head on over to our pattern store to download your copy of the Strathcona Henley and T-shirt sewing pattern.  Yes, I said henley and t-shirt pattern!  We decided to make the pattern more versatile so that it will become your go-to pattern every time you need to refresh the closet with staple tees.

The pattern includes instructions for two variations:

1. The long sleeved henley-style knit shirt with a three button placket, cozy cuffs and an easy-to-sew hem band.

2. The short sleeved classic crew-neck t-shirt with short sleeves and a twin needle (or zig-zagged) hem.

Go ahead and mix and match these variations to create endless t-shirts!  I can wait to see all the short sleeved henleys, the super easy and quick crew neck longsleeve t-shirts, and the awesome t-shirts with contrast hems and neck bands!  Really, the possibilities are endless!

Here are a few of the variations that have come to life so far both in my sewing studio and around the world in the test-sewer’s sewing rooms (more test sewer versions to come in future blog posts!):

My version of Variation 1 made in a relaxed rib knit:  The warm, slightly rusty colour and the loose, relaxed fit created by the very stretchy ribbed fabric make this version the perfect top to wear while sitting around an early fall campfire!

Blogless Anna’s version of Variation 1 using an awesome striped jersey paired with a bold black contrasting placket (see her great blog post for all the details of her sewing process):  This version of the henley looks so classic and RTW!  I imagine it would be awfully difficult to grab any other shirt when this is sitting in your closet!

My mix of Variation 1 and 2 to create a sporty hiking and mountain biking top for my dad:  I made things easy on myself by using snaps instead of buttons and by cutting off the bottom of the sleeves to use this fabric as small sleeve bands – no twin needle needed!

Do you like what you see?  Head on over to download the pattern and you can whip up one for yourself or a lucky recipient in no time at all!

The crew-neck version, when paired with sleeve and hem bands is the perfect beginner knit sewing project and the henley placket variation is a great challenge for more intermediate sewers.  If you are scared of sewing knits, you don’t need to be anymore!  The instructions include suggestions for setting up your sewing machine (even if you don’t have a serger!) to correctly deal with the fabric you chose.  They also include different tips and tricks for beginner or intermediate sewers.  Both variations are quick to make and result in a casual, slim-fitting t-shirt that will be a perfect hand-made wardrobe staple.  Happy sewing!

 


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The Strathcona Henley Photos!

Here is Matt looking dashing (I think!) in our photographed sample of the Strathcona Henley!  The pattern is out to test sewers so it won’t be long now until it is available for purchase in our online store (in case you are wondering…before the end of the month…wahoo!).

The henley is a nice casual top that is quick and quite easy to sew.  It is a great shirt for early fall camping and weekend mountain biking.  It can be sewn up in everything from rib knits (as I have done here), more stable medium weight knits, to woven stretch athletic materials.

I sewed up this sample in the most difficult, unstable rib knit I could find (Matt and I just loved the colour too much to pass it up) and despite its less than perfect top stitching it still compares for tidiness and precision with several of Matt’s go-to RTW knit shirts…so that’s acceptable for this particularly unruly knit in my books!

I look forward to making an athletic top shortly to display the pattern’s versatility and have a tutorial in the works for once the Jedediah Shorts Sew-along is over that will explain how to convert this long sleeve henley pattern into a classic short sleeved (or long sleeved) crew neck t-shirt.

By the way, as already tested, the Strathcona is great to steal from the closet and will likely become your favorite lounge-wear and night shirt!


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Two More Patterns Ordered!

Today I have some Thread Theory pattern company news and a finished project to show off.  This week, despite life being pretty busy, I was able to prepare the spec sheets and send off the Jedediah Trousers and the Strathcona Henley to Suncoast Custom to have the patterns made up!  I can’t wait to get back the patterns and see how my designs look as real garments!  I’m especially excited for the Jedediah Trousers which I designed to be very a flattering and comfortable fit.

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 Spring is officially here and suddenly June and the pattern store launch date seems to be approaching at an alarming pace.  We’ll see what we can do – things will feel like they are progressing more smoothly once the Newcastle Cardigan has been sent to the main test sewers.  This has been delayed slightly due to our decision to split the test sewing into two phases – the first group which is currently sewing up the pattern is comprised of local people (namely my grandma and my mom!) and the second group will be volunteers from around the world – one is as far away as Australia! That way we will have two opportunities to hear and respond to suggestions/critiques.IMGP0488

At school my classmates and I have been gearing up to start the production our end of the year runway lines.  I have completed a blazer as part of one of my outfits so I thought it would be fun to bring back some of my sewing for women to the blog since I am proud of how this project turned out!IMGP0506

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I designed, made the pattern and sewed up this garment.  It was drafted to fit a size six so it is a bit ill-fitting on me – especially in the chest area – but will hopefully look nice on the model as it does on our school mannequins.IMGP0507IMGP0501IMGP0512

My end of year line is called “Rationed Fashion” and is inspired by 1940s British wartime sensibilities paired with modern Pacific Northwest aesthetics.  The result of this inspiration is garments with strong shoulders, nipped in waists, sturdy fabrics, a casual feel and classic lines that will stand the test of time to be recycled into new outfits each season.IMGP0498

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In other sewing news, I have just this last week started working in the studio of an admirably energetic interior designer, Heather Draper, who is the owner of The Heather Company, a home decor company that currently sells beautiful soft furnishings online and will be opening their first brick and mortar store in June in Alberta.  It’s been very inspiring working with such beautiful fabrics!  They look wonderful turned into pillows and duvets…but man, a few of them would make the most spectacular dresses!