Thread Theory

Welcome to the new era of menswear sewing. Go ahead and create something exceptional!


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Comparing our trouser/pant patterns

We get quite a few emails asking about the fit differences between our men’s pant patterns, and just recently received a helpful suggestion from sewist, Heidi – why not make a visual blog post comparing the differences in all of our pant patterns? Sure thing!

 

In this post you will be able to compare the Jedediah Pants (our take on chinos), the Jutland Pants (our take on cargo pants), the Quadra Jeans (slightly tapered jeans) and the Fulford Jeans (straight leg jeans).

First, let’s look at the styling differences by examining the technical illustrations (right click and open image in new tab to see larger versioins of each image):

 

 

Important differences to note include: front pocket shape, yoke shape (or no yoke with darts instead), back pocket shape and size, leg style and fly styling.

  • Front Pockets: Jedediah = slash, Jutland = swooped jean pockets, Quadra = standard jean pockets, Fulford = standard jean pockets
  • Back Pockets: Jedediah = shaped and smaller patch pockets, Jutland = boxy and large patch pockets or welt Quadra = large patch pockets, Fulford = large patch pockets
  • Seat Shaping: Jedediah = deep yoke, Jutland = darts, Quadra= narrow yoke, Fulford = narrow yoke
  • Fly: Jedediah = narrow and long, Jutland = wider and two rows of stitching, Quadra = average width and two rows of stitching, Fulford = average width and two rows of stitching
  • Legs: Jedediah = very obviously tapered, Jutland = straight and wide, Quadra= subtly tapered, Fulford= straight and moderate width
  • Size Range: Jedediah = 30-40″ waist, Jutland = 30-45″ waist, Quadra = 26-50″ waist, Fulford = 26-50″ waist
  • The Jedediah Pants have slash front pockets, a deep yoke, narrow fly, and tapered legs.
  • Other notable differences include the following: The Jedediah Pants include a shorts option with rolled cuffs, the Jutland Pants include an optional full lining and all manner of work pant details, and the Quadra and Fulford Jeans include very detailed instructions for finishing the pants in a classic jeans style (topstitching tips and rivet installation).

Next, we will use the actual pattern pieces to compare fit. I’m comparing size 34. Below you can see the Jedediah Pants (yellow), Jutland Pants (brown), Quadra Jeans (blue) and Fulford Jeans (green).

Rise

The Jutland Pants and Jedediah Pants both have a high rise (just a little below the waist) while the Fulford has a mid rise and the Quadra Jeans are just slightly lower (I would still classify them to be mid-rise or perhaps mid-low rise…they are certainly not low rise). I’ve stacked the two most comparable trouser patterns so the rise and other differences are more obvious.

Crotch Curve

Let’s compare the crotch curve now: The crotch curve on the Jedediah Pants results in a close fit at the inseam (you can see how much higher it is compared to the Quadra Jeans). This high crotch creates a nice fitted appearance despite the roomy hips. The Jutland Pants feature a high crotch close fit in this area too and an even closer fit at along the center back seam. This means the design is well suited to men who have smaller bottoms and straight figures. This is because it was part of our athletic size chart that we have since relaxed slightly on our newer patterns – including the Quadra and Fulford Jeans. The athletic size chart caters towards ‘athletic slim figures’ so it is great for lankier men! The Quadra and Fulford Jeans are newer so you can see they have a lower more relaxed crotch curve to accomodate a fuller figure. The Quadra Jeans fit roomier than the Fulford jeans – you can tell this because the Quadra Jeans crotch is more of a J shape – meaning there is more room for a larger bottom at the curviest point of the ‘J’. The Fulfords, since they are intended to be a straight fit, are slimmer across the bottom. Again, look at the stacked pattern pieces to see how vastly different the crotch curve is for each design (the same stacked image is included in each section so you don’t have to scroll up and down to have a look).

Hips

Moving on to fit in the hips: The Jedediah Pants feature the most exaggerated hip curve since this is a classic feature of a chino fit. The Quadra Jeans feature a moderate hip curve. The Jutland Pants curve very slightly at the upper hip (but would still be considered quite straight in this area). The Fulford Jeans feature almost no hip curve (which is why many people like to sew these using selvage denim!).

Legs

And lastly, let’s compare the legs: Of the four designs, the Jutland Pants feature the most tapered lower leg (and this is visually exaggerated by the wide hip), the Quadra Jeans are next (almost the same taper but less obvious when worn since the hip is narrower), followed by the Fulford Jeans and then the Jutland Pants which have the wide straight leg of a work pant.

If you would like to read very detailed written descriptions about the fit and style of each garment, head to these older blog posts:

Comparison of the Jedediah Pants and Jutland Pants

Comparison of the Quadra Jeans and Fulford Jeans

To wind up this post, please admire this beautiful pair of Jutland Pants that Mathias shared with us via email. He wrote that these were the first pants he has ever sewn. Look at those slick bar tacks:

He created this pair in linen and modified them to include a gusset so that he could use them as flexible rock climbing pants. If you would like to add your own small gusset to any of our trouser patterns, check out the tutorial I made during our Jutland Pant Sew-Along.

 

I hope that this post has helped you decide on the trouser pattern that suits your purposes best. If you are still uncertain, please don’t hesitate to email me at info@threadtheory.ca with your questions!

 

[All photos of rust-colored linen trousers, including the photo at the top of the post were taken by and are property of Matthias and have been used with permission.]


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Jutland Pants Discount Code

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I received a Facebook message yesterday from Fallon, a prospective Jutland Pants sewist, wondering if we happened to have a discount code going for our Jutland Pants PDF pattern.  We didn’t but we do now!  Thanks for the idea, Fallon!  Good luck with your hunting pant project!

The discount code is FALLJUTLAND.  Enter it upon checkout to receive 20% off the Jutland Pants PDF or Tissue pattern.

To get you inspired to sew some pants for Fall, here is a gallery of some amazing finished and in progress Jutland Pants, all gathered from #jutlandpants on Instagram.  Above you can see a gorgeous pair of Jutland Shorts sewn by @inder_khalsa

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@ingvesmakesandmends embellished her fly topstitching with beautifully precise hand stitches.

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These wool Jutland Pants were sewn by @11400knit for her partner, Dave.

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This photo, also by @ingvesmakesandmends, provides a great view of some of the optional rugged details found within the Jutland Pants pattern: Cargo pockets, knee and hem reinforcements and flat fell side seams.

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There are loads of details included in the pattern (even optional lining pieces to make cozy flannel lined trousers!) but you can always add more!  @kirstyteacat added a small pocket designed to perfectly fit her husband’s torch.

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@uktriggerfish added custom topstitching to the Jutland patch pockets. Do you think the recipient’s name begins with a T?

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The Jutland Pants included a curved pocket reminiscent of jeans while the Jedediah Pants include slash pockets.  As @_ym.sews_ discusses in her Instagram caption, they are fairly straightforward to mix and match so that you can sew the style of pocket you prefer.

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@wouter.vdub always impresses me with his attention to detail.  He created some lovely welt pockets while constructing his colourful Jutland Shorts.

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@silkandtweed.scotland sewed her partner some waxed denim Jutlands.

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While @lisa.poblenz (photo shared by @pintuckandpurl) used the base Jutland pattern to sew herself some summer shorts.  She bought the pattern to sew for her partner but it has served double duty now!  Notice the red bartacks and creative slash pockets.

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Last but not least, here are two examples of modelled Jutlands.  These practical and nicely fitted cargos were sewn by @_stitchesandseams_ for her partner who is apparently already asking for another pair!

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@bustersew shows us that the Jutlands can be dressed up too!  Sew variation one in a twill or suiting to wear with a Fairfield Button-up.

Ready to try your hand at trousers?  Get the PDF or Tissue pattern 20% off until Friday, Sept. 22nd.  Use the code FALLJUTLAND and head to our shop >


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Oldies but Goodies: Menswear Round-up

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I got a bit distracted this morning delving deep into the archives of your inspiring Newcastle Cardigan and Jutland Pants projects!  I’ve compiled a few of them here in order to feature these two patterns as perfect menswear staples for early Spring.  Some of them are freshly made and some were sewn over a year ago…yes, the morning passed me by quickly!  It wasn’t wasted time though since your photos have motivated me to no end and now I’m itching to get back to work developing our upcoming pattern this afternoon.  If you would like to see many more inspiring projects, have a look over at Pattern Review or search Instagram for #newcastlecardigan and #jutlandpants.  Or you can always join the Thread Theory Sewing Community Facebook group!

Newcastle Cardigan

The Newcastle Cardigan is a perfect choice to layer over a long sleeve t-shirt or button-up on a classic early Spring day – you will be ready to bundle up when the sun goes behind a cloud and it is suddenly cool and rainy!  Add a scarf and suddenly the Newcastle looks like outerwear.

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Left: Starwhale Right: Tine & Tine L’Atelier

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Left: Trish Right: Sherry (sent by email)

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Left: Beth Right: Linda

Jutland Pants

The Jutland Pants are ideal work pants – they can be customised endlessly to suit whatever task you are working on.  If you are gardening and need to kneel on cold, wet soil, why not add padding and waterproof fabric to your knee reinforcements.  Line your trousers with merino or hard wearing cotton flannel to stay wonderfully warm.  Wax the finished Jutlands with Otter Wax to make them water repellent (as Sara did in the third set of photos below).

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Lisa

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Left: Deanna Right: Kate

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Sara

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kristincarroll

Thanks for sharing the amazing garments you have made with our Newcastle Cardigan and Jutland Pants patterns!


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12 Menswear Sewing Projects + 2 Blouses

You guys are such an inspiration!  Each day I begin the work day by checking out what you’ve been making and sharing on Instagram, via email (info@threadtheory.ca) or on Facebook.  Be it the fabric choice, the creative hacks, or the skilled stitching, your projects always allow me to see our old designs from a new perspective.

I’ve created a gallery for each pattern that you guys have been sewing of late.  Above you can see a couple ofexcellent Fairfield Button-ups (along with some VERY elegant Jedediah trousers!).  The aqua colored Fairfield and black Jeds are part of matching father and son outfits in honor of father’s day.  They were sewn by Belgian seamstress and milliner, Jo Chapeau.  The chambray Fairfield Button-up was sewn by Georgia for her partner James.  The fabric is a Robert Kauffman chambray (have you ever seen and felt these in person?  I love the depth and texture of the fabric.  It is so luxurious feeling while giving the overall appearance of a casual fabric choice.)

These two Strathcona Henleys could not look more different but they were sewn by the same person!  Esther sewed one men’s version featuring the Henley placket and long sleeves and then modified the pattern to create a women’s version which she has dubbed the Mariner’s Tee.  It looks as though there is orange striped piping around the neckline.  I love the attention to detail and the way she played with the stripes.

The Jedediah Pants and Jutland Pants are excellent skill building projects.  I never fail to feel pride and amazement each time I complete a trouser fly.  I think these talented sewists felt the same (judging by their Facebook messages, Instagram comments and emails!).  From top to bottom, left to right: 1.Jedediah Pants by Lindsay (@designbylindsay) 2. Jutland Shorts by Ben 3. Jedediah Shorts by The Drapery 4. Jutland Shorts by Isis.

The Finlayson Sweater, on the other hand, is a very quick make and is forgiving of all manner of stitching and fitting imperfections.  There is very little topstitching and the fit is boxy enough that you don’t have to worry about tweaking it much for a variety of body shapes.  Even though it is a simple design, it can still be made special by making an unusual fabric choice.  I love the color blocked sleeves and collar in the top photo (sewn by @lafamillecreative).  The French Terry used by Khadetjes for the Finlayson in the lower photos looks extremely cozy.  You can see some close up photos of the texture on her blog – it looks perfect for a chilly day like today!

Photos of Comox Trunks are some of my favorite to stumble upon because I get such a kick out of the wild prints many people select!  You would be hard pressed to find such colorful and cheery underwear in the shops!  The top pair has been sewn by @theunknownstar and the bottom pair (along with the matching thong) have been sewn by @superlousew.  I may have shared this couple’s set of undies on Instagram or the blog before but I can’t find evidence and I can’t resist spreading the concept of matching undies throughout the sewing world!

This Camas Blouse caught my eye the other day – it was sewn using a woven fabric with a beautiful cotton lace yoke.  I like how the lace yoke shows peeks of the main fabric through the gaps.  This lovely blouse was sewn by @lamuseauplacard.

Lastly, let’s not forget the Goldstream Peacoat!  Near the end of each summer progress shots of Goldstream Peacoats never fail to pop up on my Instagram feed.  These images, by @timetosew caught my eye due to the very precise basting and padstitching she has completed.  I have had the pieces cut out for a Pendleton Wool Goldstream for over a year now.  Since I have made so many Goldstream Peacoats over the last few years, I thought I would veer from the sewing process which I detail within the instruction booklet.  This process features very easy yet effective methods that are approachable even if it is your first coat project.  This time I’m going to use some of the tailoring tips from our Tailored Peacoat Series!  Obviously, I am a tad intimidated (this is why the project has sat for over a year in my WIP bag) but I am thankful for the inspiration from sewists like @timetosew who just buckle down and get stitching!  It’s time for me to do the same so Matt can finally replace his old ratty Goldstream that I made him years ago as an early sample from very cheap faux wool.

If you have a Thread Theory project on you sewing table, I would love to hear about it!  Send your questions, your ideas, your photos, and your stories to info@threadtheory.ca, message me on Facebook, or use #threadtheorydesigns.


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My Mother-In-Law’s latest Thread Theory sewing projects

Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory

In case you are a relatively new follower of the Thread Theory blog, let me introduce to you Sue, my mother-in-law!  She is a talented sewist who sewed quite a lot in the past, stopped sewing for many years and then picked up the skill again when we launched our first patterns.  She has since sewn many renditions of our designs and has even contributed to the blog!  You can read her first blog post from Thanksgiving 2013 here.  Above is a photo of Sonia (our graphic designer and my future sister-in-law), Sue and I bedecked in Camas Blouses on Thanksgiving this year.  Apparently the modelling of Thread Theory sewing projects is becoming a Thanksgiving tradition!  Sue sewed both Sonia’s blouse and her own and I sewed the one I’m wearing last winter.

Our photoshoot was complete with a photobomb:Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory-6

This is Charlie – Matt’s grandparent’s very rambunctious and adorable puppy!Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory-4

All three Camas Blouses are really unique – the outer two are sewn using slightly gauzy and light sweater knits and Sue’s features a very drapey and dense viscose knit.  I love how each print suits our personalities:
Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory-8

Recently Sue had another Thread Theory project on her sewing table.  She created a pair of dressy trousers for her husband in time for a cruise holiday.  They are the result of combining both the Jedediah and Jutland Pants patterns.  She did quite a bit of pattern manipulating for this project and took the time to write down some of the thoughts and challenges that occurred as the project progressed.  As I’m sure most sewists will agree, it is always very interesting and also relatable to read about the sewing thought process so I’m very glad that she’s shared hers with us!

Without further ado, here is Sue to explain her project:


I wanted to make a pair of dress pants for my hubby and had found a lovely light to medium weight wool blend material  that I thought would be perfect for the project, but I didn’t have a dress pant pattern. I had already made a semi-casual pair of Jeds for him, that he loved the fit and comfort of, so I had that pattern and the Jutland pattern.

The thought occurred to me that I could combine the two patterns to get what I wanted. My aim was to have front slash pockets like the Jeds, back welt pockets like the Jutlands, and a leg width somewhere between the two. I at first started to try to match the front of the Jeds pattern to the back of the Jutlands, and was struggling with it. Then I talked with Morgan (why I didn’t do that in the first place I don’t know) who reminded me of a previous post by Roni describing how to modify the Jeds pattern to remove the yoke, and add welt back pockets…perfect! So, I followed those instructions, and also widened the legs from above the knees down to the hem. Morgan also suggested that I do a mock-up first to ensure a correct fit, but I was limited by a deadline (wanted to get them done before our cruise), so I forged ahead and hoped for the best.

I wanted to end up with a professional finished look to the pants, so tried my best to do the fine finishing touches suggested in the patterns. So I used bias tape to finish the seams, and french seamed the front pockets.

Trousers 1

Like Roni, I couldn’t figure a way to do a french seam on the rear pockets, so I just used the nicest finishing stitch I could find on my machine that worked with the material.

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I knew I didn’t want flat felled seams on the legs as that was too casual a look for these pants. As well, this material was starting to fray quite a bit, and I had troubles with fraying and getting a good flat felled seam on a previous project. So in the end, I decided to do french seams for the outer leg seams, and then a standard seam and zig zag finish on the inner leg seam. I was really happy with the french seam finish on the outer leg, but not so happy with the zig zag finish on the inner leg, as my material tended to bunch up. In hindsight I think I should have had some kind of stabilizer on the material to do the finishing of the edge.

Trousers 7

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The last modification I did was to use the waistband from the Jutland pattern so that I could sew the belt loops into the upper seam and lower seam when I attached the waistband to the  waist of the pant, for a more finished look. I later hand stitched the bottom of the loop to hold it in place against the upper pant.

Trousers 2
Trousers 3

Both my husband and I are very pleased with the end result, and he has worn his pants with pride while on the cruise and many times since. These are a couple  photos  of the final product.

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All in all a very successful project. What I learned: If you are thinking of modifying a pattern, talk to Morgan before you start, she may have some valuable suggestions that can save you a lot of time and energy! (Note from Morgan: Yes, please do contact me if you are wanting help with a project or just a chance to mull over your ideas with someone!  Email me at info@threadtheory.ca)


 

Thank you for taking the time to write a blog post for us Sue!  The results of your thoughtful sewing are, as always, very professional and very wearable!


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DIY Manly Gift Guide – Father’s Day Edition

2015 is a special year because Father’s Day, the first day of summer and my birthday all land on the same day – so many reasons to celebrate!  I’ve been brainstorming homemade gifts for my dad this year and have come up with a few intriguing ideas featuring various supplies from our shop.  If you would like to explore more ideas, I made a post for Christmas 2013 with all sorts of neat DIY gift ideas for men – be sure to check this out too!

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My dad, our best model, in his Jutland Pants

Here is my collection of ideas sorted into categories based on the supplies they use from our store:

Using Otterwax and/or Canvas:

You could make this ‘DIY’ gift so easy on yourself it might feel like cheating – just buy your dad a new version of his favorite cap (or steal his old one!) and cover it in Otter Wax!  Both the large and regular size bars are in stock in our shop right now.

If you’re feeling more ambitious, make or buy a canvas work apron or jacket and give it a rugged treatment of wax to make it water resistant, windproof and long lasting.  If you’re looking inspiration when it comes to waxing, you need look no further than the Otterwax Facebook page (the source for all the photos below) and Instagram feed!

 

Using our Patterns:

Embark on a manly sewing project!  If you don’t need your present to be a surprise, a pair of Jutland Shorts might be exactly what your Dad needs as the weather warms up.  If you and your dad are pretty close, why not sew him some new undies or long underwear using our Comox Trunk pattern?  Warning, this will likely bring your father/offspring relationship to the next level – be prepared for your Dad’s regular reports on how comfortable his new underwear are!  My mom made my dad seven pairs not long ago and we received regular reports on how they were wearing in for quite some time!  The Finlayson Sweater is a great choice if you plan to sew in secret – it is loose fitting so all you need to do is compare the garment measurements to your dad’s hoodies or sweaters to choose your size.

Photo sources (clockwise) : 1. Cookin’ & Craftin (Jutland Shorts) 2. The Japanese Pattern Challenge/Mainely Dad (Finlayson Sweater) 3. Par Issy (Comox Trunks)

Using the Bag Making Supplies Kit:

Last Father’s Day we launched our Bag Making Supplies Kit in time for Father’s Day gift giving.  It includes a variety of supplies useful in most bag making pursuits but it is meant to be versatile enough that you can use it for all manner of creative projects!  1 m of beautifully smooth cotton canvas is included as well as a whole bar of Otter Wax.  You could use these supplies to make your Dad one of the waxed aprons photographed above or you could use these materials as part of a Grainline Studio Portside Duffle Bag as I did for a tutorial I made last winter.  There is enough fabric to make a heavy duty tote bag with leather handles which you could fill with your dad’s favorite beer or treats or you could get really fancy and use the material to make a custom laptop bag.  And, of course, the Dopp Kit tutorial that I originally launched with the kit would make a great Father’s Day gift.

Using the FREE Arrowsmith Undershirt Pattern:

Last, but not least, I know that MANY of you have already downloaded our free Arrowsmith Undershirt pattern since it is our most popular PDF pattern.  I have been so eager to see how your undershirts have turned out but can’t seem to find much in the way of photos anywhere!  I would LOVE to see some Dads in Arrowsmith Undershirts this Father’s Day!

Image from Sahellara’s Instagram feed.

 

What are your plans for Father’s Day?  Have you given your dad a handmade gift in the past – any big successes?  Any hilarious failures?

 


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New Paper Patterns! Release Day!

Finlayson Jutland and Camas Patterns | Thread Theory

Today is the big day!  The Finlayson Sweater, Jutland Pants and Camas Blouse are now available as tissue sewing patterns!  You can find them in our shop or at one of our 60 retailers worldwide.Finlayson Sweater | Thread Theory Finlayson Sweater back | Thread Theory

For all of you who enthusiastically bought the PDF patterns while really longing for the tissue version of the pattern – thank you for showing us such support while we worked up the funds to put these into print!  This week only (May 20th-27th) we are offering a discount code to everyone who has purchased the Finlayson, Jutland or Camas PDFs in the past.  Email us at info@threadtheory.ca BEFORE placing your paper pattern order.  List the PDF that you purchased in the email, your full name and, if possible, your order number).  We will send you a discount code that can be used towards your tissue pattern purchase!  The discount means you will have received the PDF for free!Jutland Pants | Thread Theory Jutland Pants back | Thread Theory

The code will only be valid for one week (the discount will end at the end of the day on May 27th) so email us quickly so you can place your order right away! (info@threadtheory.ca)

Camas Blouse | Thread Theory Camas Blouse back | Thread Theory

We are so excited to pack up these tissue patterns and fly them to sewers all around the world.  Nothing beats the ease of sewing with a tissue pattern, an instruction booklet sitting flat on the table beside you and a rugged envelope ready to pack up your compact tissue pieces when you are done your project.Pattern Contents | Thread Theory

 

Happy sewing!  Now, come on over to check out the patterns in our shop!


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Are you ready? Wednesday Release Date!

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Ready to start sewing?  We will be releasing paper versions of the Finlayson Sweater, Jutland Pants and Camas Blouse on Wednesday, May 20th!  That’s only 5 days away!

To feed your creative energy in the meantime, here are a selection of your fabulous makes with these three patterns.  Some are from when we first released the PDF versions of these patterns and some are brand new.  Enjoy!

Camas Blouse

1. Swing and Sew: I love the shorter length and wine colored viscose!

2. Sewing in the Shade: A beautiful use of black as contrast with this rich print.

3. Miss Crayola Creepy: As always, I love her style!

4. Jolies Bobines: I’ve never seen such a fluid looking sequin fabric – very stunning.

5. Imagine Gnats featuring A Happy Stitch: Great tutorial!  The Camas could be made into everything from a plaid tunic over leggings to the cutest linen nightgown.

6.  Girls In the Garden: A very flattering Camas complete with a blog post detailing the fit changes.

7. I Bet You Can Make That: Love the dark blue fabric choice – very elegant and simple.

Finlayson Sweater

1.  L’ Énervée de la Machine à Coudre: Beautiful hood lining!

2. The Japanese Pattern Challenge: A stunning fabric choice and a great use for a single toggle or button (since I always seem to be left with one extra after coat projects).

3. Suzie Creates: The Renfrew from Sewaholic meets the Finlayson to create a flattering fitted ladies Finlayson Sweater!

4. Thornberry: Great choice of stripes :).

5. Or Sew It Seams: A gorgeous Finlayson featuring a lush quilted hood lining!

Jutland Pants

1, 2 and 3. Thimblenest: Hard wearing jeans for a hard working husband!

 

Inspired?  See you on Wednesday!

 


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Tutorial: Easy ways to create a roomier trouser crotch

Let’s say you have just sewn up a muslin of the Jedediah Pants or Jutland Pants pattern (or any other trouser pattern) and notice strain lines radiating from the fly of the trouser when you try the muslin on.  The trousers seem to pull and bind between the legs and are generally tight feeling and restricting across the stomach and upper thighs.  Don’t worry, this fit issue can be overcome!  Here is how:

With the muslin still on the wearer, cut a horizontal line through the center front of the crotch.  The fabric will release the tension and you will be left with a smile shaped gap.  Measure the widest point on this gap – this is the total amount you will need to add to the crotch seam so that there will no longer be strain lines.

muslin

There are two common pattern alterations that you can try to add this measurement to the crotch seam.  The first common and quick fix to try is to simply lengthen the crotch depth by slashing across the pants front at the hip and adding the appropriate amount of length.  This simple pattern alteration maintains the shape of the crotch curve but just makes it a little longer.

lengthening crotch depth

If you try this pattern alteration and it does not seem to work for you (for instance, your new muslin now looks like you are wearing drop crotch pants!), this is likely because the fit problem isn’t about the crotch depth being to short for you.  Instead, the problem is that the crotch circumference is too narrow and the seat seam curve does not suit the shape of your body.  This may be because your abdomen is slightly more rounded than the fit model’s shape or it could be due to roundness in the crotch caused by specifically male body parts!  Either way, you will need to perform a slightly more complicated alteration to your pants front pattern piece.

Here is how to add crotch circumference: 

1. Mark all the seamlines on your pants front pattern piece.  The seam allowance included within the Jedediah Pants and Jutland Pants patterns in 5/8″.  When performing alterations to a pattern piece you need to work from the seamline (where you will actually be sewing) rather than from the edge of the pattern piece so that you will retain the original shape of the pattern.

Mark seamlines

2.  Draw a horizontal line across the hips of the pant front pattern piece.  Slash along that line from the fly front to just before the side seamline – don’t cut all the way through the seamline and seam allowance because you will need to leave a little bit of paper here to act as a hinge.  Now cut into the seam allowance without removing that tiny paper hinge.

3. Draw a line from the inseam seamline at knee level up to the crotch seam.  Try to end your line somewhere before the fly extension curve.  Cut from the crotch seam down to the inseam at knee level and again leave a little hinge of paper at the seamline.  Cut into the seam allowance on a diagonal without removing that tiny paper hinge.

Slash lines

4. Spread the two slashes slightly so that the crotch seam extends to the left and the waistline swings upwards.  You will notice that the little clips you made into the seam allowance will allow the seam allowance to overlap as you spread the pattern.  When measuring along the seamline (not the edge of the pattern piece), the total size of your two gaps should equal the measurement that you found when you cut across your first muslin.

Spread

5. Secure your spread pattern piece in place by taping the pattern to a couple new sheets of tissue paper.  Smooth the curve along the crotch seamline and smooth the seam allowance to match.

 

6. Depending on the pattern you are using, you will likely need to adjust a number of other small pattern pieces to suit the changes you made.  These will likely include the pocket pieces and facings and the fly shield.  The easiest way to make these changes is to line up the paper pattern pieces underneath the pants front pattern and trace the new angles onto the pocket.  Lengthen the fly shield to match the new length of the fly facing.

Other pattern pieces

 

*** If you are experiencing lines radiating from center back across the bottom and the pants seat seems generally too tight and flat for the rounded shape of your body, the same alteration can be applied to the pants back.  Slash and spread along several points at center back – try to pick points along the seat seam where the seam seems to least match your body.


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New: Large Otter Wax! (Plus an examination of Matt’s waxed Jutlands two months later)

Otter-Wax-New-12 Blog  The Otter Wax bars that we carry in the ‘Supplies‘ section of our shop are constantly on the verge of selling out – so, with our most recent order from Portland, Oregon, we decided to branch out and add a new Otter Wax bar to our inventory!  We now stock both the regular size of Otter Wax and the new-to-us large Otter Wax bar.

Otter-Wax-New-13 Blog If you are interested in waxing large projects such as a pair of Ginger Jeans or a Cascade Duffle Coat, the large Otter Wax bar, weighing in at 5 oz, is the bar for you!  To give you an indication of how much you can wax with this new, larger bar, I have thoroughly waxed a pair of Jutland Pants for Matt using two regular Otter Wax bars (and had a little nugget of wax left over ready for touch ups).  Since the large Otter Wax bar weighs just over double the regular bar, you should easily be able to wax a pair of jeans with a single bar!  If you are planning to wax a smaller project (shoes, for instance), the regular size bar will still be your best choice – you will be able to wax two to three pairs of shoes with a single regular bar.

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In case you have been wondering, here is a bit of an update on how Matt’s Otter Waxed Jutland Pants (originally posted here) are faring.  With all the early Spring rains we’ve been having lately, Matt has been getting a lot of wear out of them.  Despite walking our dog, Luki, through many mud puddles, splitting wood, going on a number of hikes, and generally wearing the Jutlands like a second skin, Matt’s pants still look like new.

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The dirt that he invariably covers them with on each outing brushes off on it’s own.  Apparently a quick once-over with a stiff bristled brush will remove any stubborn mud from Otter Waxed fabric but, as of yet, we have not needed to do this as the mud sloughs off on its own.  The way it self cleans like this kind of reminds me of a dog’s coat – as the mud dries the fur switches from a muddy/sandy mess to a nice clean coat – though I couldn’t say the same for the floor around the dog!  Because we haven’t needed to hand wash the pants yet, there has been no need to touch them up with a light coat of wax.  I imagine, over time, it might be a good idea to re-coat the hems and possibly the fly area as these are the sections of the pants that receive the most wear.

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Matt finds his waxed pants very comfortable to wear because they are heavier and warmer than nylon rain pants and, of course, don’t make an annoying swishing sound as he walks (as rain pants are prone to do).  They also dress up nicely and he has received compliments on his ‘trendy’ and ‘stylish’ waxed pants in more posh atmospheres (which is pretty funny since I am used to thinking of them as his rugged work pants and chide him for refusing to dress up when going out for dinner!).  As he’s worn the pants, the wax has sunk further into the weave of the fabric and so they feel softer than they originally did when I waxed them just over two months ago.

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They don’t bead the water quite as much as they did when they were originally waxed but, like I said, the wax is still very effectively protecting the fabric and, despite the lack of beading, Matt reports that they keep him dry quite a bit longer than un-waxed canvas pants or jeans do when he is walking in the rain.

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This Spring I have plans to use Otter Wax on a number of new projects – some that involve sewing and some that feature existing clothing.  I’d like to wax a ball cap for my Dad and some Carhartt coveralls for Matt (they were pretty expensive so waxing them should help them last longer).  For myself, I plan to wax the black denim Ginger Jeans that I’ve had in progress for quite some time now!

In the meantime, here is a bit of waxing inspiration:

  • A thorough documentation of Otter Waxing a canvas computer bag.  Two coats of wax are applied – the first with a hair dryer so it sinks into the fabric, the second without heat so that it sits on the surface.  Water is applied after each coat as a ‘beading’ test.
  • A waxed canvas vest that beads water and looks pleasantly ‘worn in’.
  • Are you craving an outdoor adventure?  Here’s a pretty little video featuring an Otter Waxed hat and fly fishing in the rain.