Thread Theory

Welcome to the new era of menswear sewing. Go ahead and create something exceptional!


2 Comments

Tailored Peacoat Series: #5

logo for series

Day #1 – Tuesday, March 18th: Prepare Pattern, Cut Fabric, Mark Seam Lines

Day #2 – Wednesday, March 19th: Adjust Pockets, Apply Canvas and Interfacing

Day #3 – Thursday, March 20th: Sewing the Facing and Lining

Day #4 – Friday, March 21st: Sewing the Main Body Seams and Adding Shoulder Pads

Day #5 – Saturday, March 22nd: Creating the Collar

Day # 6 – Sunday, March 22nd: Inserting the Sleeves

Day #7: – Monday, March 23rd: The Finishing Touches

Tailoring the Collar

I split the under collar at the center back.  I cut two pieces on the bias from hair canvas, trimming away the seam allowance, and also cut two bias under collar  pieces from wool.  If you are suave like Matt (Matt appreciates that statement, thanks Dana! :P) and want to pop the collar of your coat, I would cut the under collar from a single piece, but you can still cut the interfacing on the bias.

lightly pad stitched the canvas to the under collar, making sure I didn’t go all the way through the wool –  but my wool is quite thick and fuzzy, so if your fabric is thinner or has a tighter weave and you’re worried your stitches might show, its okay to skip pad stitching.

padstitch undercollar

Cross stitch the canvas to the wool to keep the edges in place.

cross stitch undercollar

Fold the seam allowance up from notch to notch along the neck edge and baste in place.

Lay the coat out with the neck facing you, and with the wool side of the under collar up, pin the collar to the neck edge matching center back and the notches.  I also put a pin at the roll line.

pin undercollar

Making sure the canvas and linings are laying nicely inside the coat, and easing as needed along the neck edge, baste the collar to the coat.

Baste undercollar

Check to make sure the lining isn’t doing anything weird (sometimes it likes to jump around) — (Remember that Dana didn’t use the back neck facing so she is dealing with lining fabric at the neck seam) — and sew the collar to the coat using a fell stitch and double thickness of thread (to see how to do the fell stitch, have a look at the second stitch on Colette Patterns’ “Basic Hand Stitches” guide).  Don’t be afraid to catch the facing and lining.

sew collar

From the inside, cross stitch the neck seam allowance to the collar, clipping where needed to get it to lie flat.

cross stitch neck seam allowance

Cut a piece of fabric about 1 ½ inches wider and 2 inches longer than the under collar.  Fold it in half, and using a hot steam iron, stretch the top and bottom long edges.

stretch strip

Don’t stretch the center of the strip.  When you’re done, it should ripple on both edges.

strip should ripple

Mark the center of the strip.  Align the center of the strip with the center back of the collar and pin in place.  Its easiest to do this with the coat on a dress form, but you can also drape it over your knee or hand/arm.

align strip

Working from the center back to the front, smooth the fabric over the collar, keeping the straight edge at the top even with the seam allowance of the under collar, and pinning as you go.  You’re trying to build some ease into the upper collar so it will roll nicely.

smooth fabric strip

Its okay to trim some of the excess fabric if its getting difficult to work with, just make sure you have plenty for seam allowances.

Once the upper collar is pinned in place, baste around the outer edge of the collar, and remove the pins.

baste edge of collar

Sew the outer edge of the collar from notch to notch with the canvas side facing up, similar to how the front facing is sewn onto the coat front.  Press the seam open and grade and trim the seam allowance.  Turn the collar right side out, and baste close to the edge, rolling the seam towards the under collar, like the front edge.  Put a line or two of basting in the collar, working from the edge towards the coat, then fold the collar under (like the lapels on the facing) and run a line of basting to keep the ease in the upper collar.

turn collar

Trim the neck edge of the upper collar so you have 3/8″ to 1/2″ seam allowance, and turn it under and baste in place.  Slip stitch in place.

slip stitch collar

Well, there you go, the collar is finished!  How different from our usual approach to sewing a collar!  I look forward to draping my own upper collar when I sew Matt his tailored Goldstream in time for next winter.

Thank you to everyone who has commented via the blog/email/in person about the useful nature of this series.  Dana put a lot of work into all of these posts and I am sure many of us will be referring to her teachings for all sorts of coat projects in the future!

Look forward to a post on an alternative approach to setting in sleeves tomorrow!


5 Comments

Tailored Peacoat Series: #4

logo for series

Day #1 – Tuesday, March 18th: Prepare Pattern, Cut Fabric, Mark Seam Lines

Day #2 – Wednesday, March 19th: Adjust Pockets, Apply Canvas and Interfacing

Day #3 – Thursday, March 20th: Sewing the Facing and Lining

Day #4 – Friday, March 21st: Sewing the Main Body Seams and Adding Shoulder Pads

Day #5 – Saturday, March 22nd: Creating the Collar

Day # 6 – Sunday, March 22nd: Inserting the Sleeves

Day #7: – Monday, March 23rd: The Finishing Touches

Today is a bit of a shorter post during which Dana demonstrates how to securely place the shoulder pads and shows us her method for assembling the side and shoulder seams of the coat and lining.  You may notice that the procedure is a little different than outlined in the Goldstream Peacoat instruction booklet because the lining pieces have already been separately basted to their corresponding self pieces.  Dana’s process involves a lot of hand stitching to complete the lining and I am sure you will agree that this is a very effective way to ensure complete accuracy when sewing such a slippery fabric.

Side Seams (both coat and lining) and Hem

Sew the side seams together and press open.  To sew the lining, at the side seams, fold one edge over the other making sure there’s a bit of ease in the lining.  Slip stitch the lining seams.

slipstitch lining side seams

Baste the hem up close to the edge, then again about half an inch down from the cut edge.

baste hem

Make an ease pleat in the lining, then slipstitch the lining down.

slipstitch lining to hem

 Shoulders Seams and Pads

Sew the shoulder seams.  Since most back shoulders are bigger than the front shoulder, its easiest to sew with the front on top and the back will ease itself in while you stitch.

I’ve found it much easier to place shoulder pads when the coat is on a dress form, or at least on a person.  My shoulder pads have a center notch; align this with the shoulder seam, and pin the pad in place.

shoulder pad placement

Move the pins so they’re holding the pad to the canvas (separated from the coat fabric), and diagonally baste the pad from the canvas side.

baste shoulder pad

Turn the canvas over, and cross stitch the pad to the canvas.

Cross stitch shoulder pad

Re-align the canvas and shoulder pad in the coat (its easy to do this over your hand) and baste it in place.

baste shoulder

Fold the back lining over the front lining and facing, and baste in place.

baste shouler lining

That’s it for today!  The main body and lining of your coat is now assembled.  Tomorrow we will be working on the collar.  Look forward to trying out some pad stitching (I’m excited for this part because I have never tried doing this before!).


10 Comments

Tailored Peacoat Series: #3

logo for series

Day #1 – Tuesday, March 18th: Prepare Pattern, Cut Fabric, Mark Seam Lines

Day #2 – Wednesday, March 19th: Adjust Pockets, Apply Canvas and Interfacing

Day #3 – Thursday, March 20th: Sewing the Facing and Lining

Day #4 – Friday, March 21st: Sewing the Main Body Seams and Adding Shoulder Pads

Day #5 – Saturday, March 22nd: Creating the Collar

Day # 6 – Sunday, March 22nd: Inserting the Sleeves

Day #7: – Monday, March 23rd: The Finishing Touches

Today, on the third day of our Tailored Peacoat Series, Dana will be teaching a few tricks to put into practice while sewing your Goldstream Peacoat facing and lining:

The Facing and Lining

I overcut coat linings, with the exception of the front edge that is attached to the facing.  Fabrics, especially slippery lining fabrics, tend to shift and not always do what you want them to, so its very helpful having a bit of extra fabric to work with. I sewed the front facing to the front lining, stopping about an inch from the hem, trimming the seam allowances to 1/4” and inserting a strip of bias cut from the wrong side of my lining fabric.  The bias strip is purely decorative, but can be a nice little bit of color.  Instead of doing an interior patch pocket, I made double piped pockets.

Welt pocket

Sew the coat front and the facing/lining together, from the collar notch where you stopped trimming the canvas to the end of the facing at the hem.  Its easiest to sew with the coat side facing up, and stitching about a needle’s distance from the canvas.  Grade the seam allowance and press the seam open.  Baste the front edge, rolling the facing to the inside below the top button mark. When you get to the lapel, baste so the seam is in the center. 

baste front edge

Once the edges are basted, run a line of basting in the center of the lapel, then baste the roll line, stopping about an inch below the neck edge.

baste lapel and roll line

Fold the lapel over, and working from the inside of the coat, baste a couple lines, working from the edge of the coat towards the lining.  Folding the lapel will ensure it has enough room to roll easily when worn.

Baste close to the facing/lining seam, then fold the lining back and cross stitch the facing to the canvas, working around the pocket.

cross stitch facing to canvas

Fold the lining back far enough so the pocket can lay flat, then cross stitch the side of the pocket to the canvas.

cross stitch pocket

Lay the lining flat, and baste it down, leaving plenty of room for the armscye, side seams, and hem.

baste lining

From the front of the coat, trim the lining even with the wool around the shoulders, armscye, and side seams.

Trim lining

At the neck edge, clip the facing to the neckline about 1” past the roll line.

clip facing

Then, fold the fabric under and even with the neck edge.  Baste, then slip stitch, down.

fold uner and baste

The fronts are done!

The Back and Lining

I cut the back lining from the same piece as the back, since I’m not using the back facing.  I did leave enough in the lining for an ease pleat center back.  Once the center back seam and center back of the lining are sewn, baste them together along the center back seam, then in a horseshoe shape, leaving room for side seams, shoulder pads, and hems.

baste lining to back

 

Now that all the lining and facing pieces are assembled and basted to the main coat, we are ready to sew the main coat seams and insert the shoulder pads tomorrow!


7 Comments

Tailored Peacoat Series: #2

logo for series

Day #1 – Tuesday, March 18th: Prepare Pattern, Cut Fabric, Mark Seam Lines

Day #2 – Wednesday, March 19th: Adjust Pockets, Apply Canvas and Interfacing

Day #3 – Thursday, March 20th: Sewing the Facing and Lining

Day #4 – Friday, March 21st: Sewing the Main Body Seams and Adding Shoulder Pads

Day #5 – Saturday, March 22nd: Creating the Collar

Day # 6 – Sunday, March 22nd: Inserting the Sleeves

Day #7: – Monday, March 23rd: The Finishing Touches

Today, the second day of our Tailored Peacoat Series, Dana is walking us through a couple minor changes to the front patch pockets.  She will also be discussing the use of hair canvas to interface the coat front.  Okay, lets get right into it:

The Front Patch Pockets

The only change I made to the pockets was to fuse a piece of interfacing to the top of the pocket (the part that will be folded over to the back).  It will keep the pocket from stretching (this is a great tip, especially if the wearer likes to shove their hands into their pockets quite often).  I used weft interfacing.

interfaced pocket

I basted around the edge of the pocket, making sure the lining rolled to the inside.  I also did this for the pocket flap.

basted pocket

Using the placement markings for the top of the pocket as a guide, I basted a piece of pocketing (I used washed quilting cotton, but there are pocketing fabrics and Silesia out there) on the wrong side to act as a stay for the pocket (Definition: A stay is a piece of material applied to the wrong side of the self fabric to provide extra strength and resilience.  An example that is commonly visible in ready to wear clothing is a button sewn to the inside of a garment at the same time as the exterior button is sewn.  When used, the button will be pulling on the inside button rather than stretching out and damaging the self fabric).  The stay fabric should be about 2” wider than the finished pocket and 3” tall.  Position it so it will be behind the flap but still low enough to catch the top of the pocket.

pocket stay

I basted the pocket in place before slip stitching the edge down, then top-stitching.  Yes, I do LOTS of basting.

 Applying Canvas/Interfacing

In a hand tailored coat, the interfacing is attached to the coat front, not the facing.  I used hair canvas for interfacing. You can buy premade coat fronts, or make your own.  If you buy one, I’d recommend getting a few sizes bigger than the coat you’re making, so you know it will be big enough. (B. Black & Sons, the retailer mentioned in yesterday’s post, is a great place to buy pre-made coat fronts such as this one.)

coat front

Lay the coat front on top of the canvas, and baste in the center of the canvas, making sure you leave space at the top for the shoulder pads, and don’t extend beyond the hem line.

baste along centre of canvas-01

Baste along the front edge, about an inch from the roll line and across the bottom, and at the far edge of the canvas and about 2” away from the armscye so you have room to set the sleeves.

baste perimeter

Next, baste the roll line, taking smaller stitches so its easier to see the line from the back of the coat, and baste the lapel.  If the canvas extends beyond the fabric in any places, trim it so they’re even.

baste along roll line

To pad stitch or not to pad stitch; that is the question (Gertie has written a tutorial on pad stitching as part of her Lady Grey Sew-Along).  On a suit coat, you would pad stitch the lapel, shaping the wool and canvas so the lapel rolls and sits nicely on the finished suit.  Overcoats, however, are often designed with the lapels to be worn open or closed, and if both sides of the lapel will be visible, you don’t want the stitches from pad stitching to be seen.  If you know the lapels will always be worn open and want to pad stitch the lapels, go for it.

Trim the canvas even with the edge of the front and hem (here’s where knowing exactly where the edge is comes in handy), stopping at the notch for the collar.  Cross stitch (also called catch stitch) the canvas to the coat.

Cross stitch

Why didn’t I tape the front edge?  Taping the front edge keeps it from stretching, important if you have any curved edges, and makes a nice crisp edge.  However, coupled with heavy fabric, it creates extra bulk, and the top-stitching will reinforce the front edge.

In the last picture, you can see that I divided the roll line into thirds in preparation for taping the roll line.  I used 3/8” cotton twill tape.  Please use cotton tape, not that poly stuff sold in packages.  It doesn’t respond well to a hot iron and lots of steam.  Pin the end of the tape 1/3 of the way from the front edge, mark the 2/3 spot, then pull the tape 1/4″ to 3/8” past the mark, then lay the tape flat along the rest of the roll line.  There should be some rippling in the coat.

tape placement

Baste the tape down, easing in the excess.

baste tape

Whip stitch the tape down, catching only the canvas, then press the crap  out of it (Nicely said Dana :P).  The ease will press out, and the tape will keep the roll line snug against the wearer.

IMG_0438

And that’s it for today’s lesson!  Tomorrow we will move on to sewing the facing and the lining.  I meant to remind everyone last post, but forgot so will remind you here instead: We have an Encyclopedia Peacoatica that was compiled by us from your wonderful contributions a couple months ago.  It’s a great place to go to find links to resources when planning to start your Goldstream Peacoat!


15 Comments

Tailored Peacoat Series: #1


logo for series

This week I have a surprise treat for you! A mini sewing series for all you aspiring tailors out there!

This post will be the first of a week long daily series about the Goldstream Peacoat.  The Goldstream Peacoat was designed to be the easiest and simplest peacoat possible to sew.  The instructions produce a nicely finished coat that is equivalent to those you would find in affordable and good quality ready-to-wear stores.  I think that sewers will and do appreciate the simplicity of the pattern.  That being said, there is absolutely nothing stopping you from using the Goldstream Peacoat to create a high-end tailored garment that will last the wearer a life time! Indeed, after these seven posts you will be familiar with all the tricks and practices necessary to elevate your peacoat sewing project to a “Tailored” status.

Here is the posting schedule:

Day #1 – Tuesday, March 18th: Prepare Pattern, Cut Fabric, Mark Seam Lines

Day #2 – Wednesday, March 19th: Adjust Pockets, Apply Canvas and Interfacing

Day #3 – Thursday, March 20th: Sewing the Facing and Lining

Day #4 – Friday, March 21st: Sewing the Main Body Seams and Adding Shoulder Pads

Day #5 – Saturday, March 22nd: Creating the Collar

Day # 6 – Sunday, March 22nd: Inserting the Sleeves

Day #7: – Monday, March 23rd: The Finishing Touches

Once this sew-along is over, these posts will be available in the “Sew-Along” drop down on our website.

I am by no means a skilled and practised tailor.  Fortunately, Dana, one of our very skilled pattern testers, is!  She has put a huge amount of work into documenting her Goldstream Peacoat sewing process and, you can see by the beautifully crisp results, that all her efforts paid off.  I hope that you will be able to benefit from her kind offer to share her knowledge.  She has done an excellent job of thoroughly explaining each step she took.  Thank you so much for doing this Dana and welcome to the Thread Theory blog!

Finished peacoat

Dana’s beautifully tailored peacoat modelled by Travis.

Now, without further ado, here is Dana with her week long tailoring series:

I’m Dana, and I’ve been doing theatrical costuming for 11 years.  I’ve always loved futzy handwork, and tailoring is a great way to indulge in it.  The theater I work for has some amazing tailors, and I’ve learned so much about menswear and construction from them.  While the patterns we work with are custom drafted, there are lots of tailoring techniques that translate to commercial patterns.

Basic tips to begin creating a tailored Goldstream Peacoat:

Two things you do much more of in tailoring are basting and pressing.

  1. I baste in white thread or a color that matches my fabric.
  2. Pressing with lots of steam will help you shape a coat beyond what seams and interfacing could ever do.  Since you will use so much heat and steam, it’s important to pre-shrink, or at least steam press, your fabric, lining, and all interfacings and tapes you will use.

 

Helpful Tailoring Resources and Materials:

I found the wool, lining, and hair canvas at a local fabric store.  The buttons are from Mood, and shoulder pads and silk buttonhole twist are from B. Black and Sons.  B Black is a fantastic place to get everything you need to make a coat, and their customer service is great. 

You’ll also want beeswax so you can wax and press thread for hand-sewing. (If you would like to know more about using beeswax, have a look at this BurdaStyle article.)

The two books I use the most are Classic Tailoring Techniques by Roberto Cabrera and Patricia Flaherty Meyers, and Tailoring Suits the Professional Way by Clarence Poulin.  The Poulin book is out of print, but if you can get your hands on a copy it really is a fantastic book.

Pattern Prep and Cutting

  • Optional – Adjusting the Seam Allowances: The first thing I did was remark the pattern pieces to have ¼” seam allowance, except at the front edge, neckline, and hems.  I cut all the seam allowance off of those.  Using ¼” seam allowance is a personal preference, although it really comes in handy when setting sleeves. 
    It is very helpful to know where the stitch lines for the front edge, neck, and hems are, though.
  • Necessary – Finding the Roll Line: You do need to figure out where the roll line is on the coat front (Definition: The roll line is where the collar/lapel folds over on a garment) .  The roll line starts at the top button, and is angled towards the neck, coming about 1/2” away from the neck seam line at the shoulder.

The top of the roll line is about 3 ½” from the notch for the end of the collar on a size large.

roll line

After I marked my new pattern lines on the fabric, along with all the notches, button placements, etc, I did add seam allowances beyond ¼”, along with 1” on the front and neck, and at least 1½” on the coat and sleeve hems.

Tailor Tacks (i.e. mark where you will be sewing)
mark seamlines

I tailor tacked all the pattern lines (Note: Details on how to make tailor tacks are included in the peacoat instruction booklet); even if you don’t want to make the seam allowance changes I made, I would recommend tailor tacking the front edge, neck edge, hems, and all the notches, button marks, pocket marks, etc.  It’s one of the easiest ways to make sure you can see these marks on both sides of the fabric, and if you’re working with thick wool like I am, chalk marks tend to fade pretty quickly.  I used crochet cotton for tailor tacking thread because it grabs fabric better than regular thread.

tailor tacks

Thanks for this first post, Dana!

That is quite a lot of handwork to keep you busy.  Tomorrow we will move on to demonstrating how to adjust the pockets to suit the tailored coat and how to apply horse hair canvas and interfacing.

Are you already learning lots?  I know I am!

 


6 Comments

How Thread Theory Sees Sewing

Hey everyone! For this week’s blog post, Morgan and I decided to do a little feature on a company that has greatly inspired us in both our business and personal life: Merchant and Mills.

Merchant and Mills is a UK company that embodies everything we aspire to be: Understated, of quality and substance, whole-hearted and eager to pass on their mission to others!

Seriously though, just watch their promotional video, even if you’ve never sewn a stitch in your life you will be itching to pick up a needle and thread by the time it is over:

http://vimeo.com/69304563

Amazing, right? The whole “purchase quality – purchase once” ideal has always been important to me, and I think Merchant and Mills is an excellent example of this. I also, being a man, love the way they treat sewing. It makes me want to take up sewing and still feel masculine about it! They present a pair of thread snips as something as solid and serious such I would expect a hammer and chisel, for instance, to be presented.

Morgan and I are on a mission to create a Thread Theory studio that embodies these values and is a place that, each time we walk in the door, makes us feel inspired to create something that matches the branding we want our company to have.  You’ve seen Morgan’s dream ironing board/sewing cabinet.  Now we’re moving on to smaller projects to finish the room up.  Here are some recent images from Pinterest that we have been using as a source of inspiration:

de6ceb764d5c2edc2bc69febebbe0f7d c4cefe16707f7f122009096cb67d94ce bee6a2c6634988b3950e87d6dc1eeb8f b90f1304df7fcd7511e5a60db5a3fda1 a5b49b14ee28577bbf16ec58e9dcd8e7 95385d439b23054c01220f0f58e31f51 236b5859f047bc9ec115221911a38ef1 8dea553db080a470a598e263290c881d 6bf980aeb6cb971c9a5fe1c3298e44cf

Our next project is to add something like this to her thread organizers:

f765c33700c0b8704dd0623ae940fa57

On that note, I want to wax on about a tool we already have that fits our criteria for a sewing tool and studio space: Morgan’s amazing scissors. As much as I love my own tools, I get a ridiculous amount of joy every time I pick these bad boys up. They feel nice and heavy in the hand and have steel all through the handles. Most importantly, they are insanely sharp and precisely machined so that each “snip” cuts evenly all down the length of the blade (you know how some scissors cut best at the base of the blade or right near the middle? Not these!).

IMGP1308

They are the Kai 7205 8″ Professional Shears and can be found here!

What are your favourite sewing tools? Do you like to spend the extra money on a high quality item, or do you save your money and hope for the best?


12 Comments

DIY Ironing Table

Hello blog world!

Morgan and I were too excited about the most recent addition to the sewing room to wait for the Friday post! So, without further ado, here it is!

Resized-0002

This DIY tutorial is for an ironing table that is specially designed to pin together duvets, which Morgan sews for The Heather Company. It is also the perfect table for ironing as well as a great cutting mat surface.

This tutorial is for the working surface of the table (which contains several important layers), as the shelves can really be made of anything (but more on that later!)

Here are some things you will need!

  • A sheet of plywood
  • Carpet padding
  • Heavy canvas (12oz to 14oz)
  • Cotton needle punch batting
  • A staple gun
  • Scissors
  • A ruler
  • Liquid glue

Resized-0002 Resized-0003 Resized-0004

The first step is to determine the size you want your table to be. We decided to make it the full width of our spare bedroom (a.k.a. the sewing studio) and 24″ deep. This allows the cutting mat to easily sit on top without any overhang. Then, simply cut a piece of plywood to the size you want! The thickness of the plywood all depends on how wide the gap between the shelves will be; ask your local handy-man for help!

Next, get your carpet underlay and cut it with scissors or a box knife to cover the entire surface of the plywood.

Resized-0001

Do a dry fit first, and then cover your plywood with glue squiggles. I used an all-purpose liquid super glue made by Titan.

Resized-0005

Resized-0006

 

Next, wait for the glue to dry enough that it holds the carpet padding in place (it doesn’t have to completely set). Lay out your canvas with the cotton needle punch on top, then flip the plywood and carpet padding upside-down on top of it all. You should now have the underside of the plywood showing with a layer of carpet padding, cotton needle punch, and canvas underneath. We let the needle punch overlap a couple inches on each side, and then canvas quite a bit more than that – about 6-8 inches.

Resized-0007

 

Now comes the fun part! With one person on each end, pull the canvas nice and tight, doing your best to get it stretched in both directions. Fold it up and over the raw side of the plywood and staple it down!

Resized-0008Work your way around the whole surface stapling every 6 inches or so. If you get a few staples sticking up, tap them down with a hammer.

Resized-0009 Resized-0010 Resized-0011

 

Next, flip the whole kit-and-kaboodle over and admire your handy-work!

Resized-0012 Resized-0013 Resized-0014The canvas might not be super tight at this point, but as you iron on it, the canvas will shrink and it will make a nice smooth surface.

Next, put it on top of some cupboards/side tables/saw horses/anything you want! My mum and dad had promised Morgan some custom-made cabinets for her birthday, and we thought this would be a perfect opportunity to cash in! We designed them to have enough space to hold Morgan’s Husqvarna machine and her serger, and to have a small slot for her cutting table. My parents went above and beyond and built the cabinets up on small risers and made slide out platforms! We were totally blown away by their sturdy-ness, and we sanded them and applied a coat of black walnut Danish Oil and set them up!

Resized-0001 Resized-0003 Resized-0004 Resized-0005 Resized-0007 Resized-0008 Resized-0006All in all, the ironing table-top was a VERY simple process. We did the entire thing (except cutting the plywood) on our living room floor and only had to do a quick vacuum to clean up after! The carpet padding makes a bit of a mess when you cut it… We weren’t keeping track of time, but this project could EASILY be done in an an afternoon/evening. And, once the table-top is done, you could put it on anything from filing cabinets to Ikea Expedit cubes!

Have any questions on the process? Feel free to post below and I’ll do my best to help!