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Sayward Raglan Sew-along: Day 2

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Sayward-Raglan-Blog-9

So we are about to start on our Sayward Raglan sewing project but first we need to choose our size and make any fit and style adjustments we might need!

Choosing your size:

Choose a shirt size-7

Within the instruction booklet I included a detailed explanation and diagram showing you how best to choose your size.  Let me walk you through it!  (Open image in a new tab to see it full size…and feel free to skip down to our fun pattern hacks if you are comfortable choosing your size without assistance!)

How to choose your size

Under How to Choose Your Size you will see an explanation on how to collect body and garment measurements.  While body measurements are most essential, we always include garment measurements for our patterns as well, this way you can compare them to existing garments to see if the Sayward will end up with the fit and style that you or your recipient are used to wearing.  Let’s illustrate this point with scenarios:

Scenario 1:

For instance, you may be excited to sew a raglan and find that the body measurements perfectly match the size L but, when you measure a favourite t-shirt, the garment measurements match our size XL…well, this is an excellent indicator that the man you are sewing for might prefer a looser fit than the Sayward is designed to produce!  In that scenario, simply make the executive decision to sew XL and produce a Sayward that fits differently than we designed, or, sew the L and push the boundaries of your prospective wearer (if he is interested in trying a new fit).

Scenario 2:

When collecting Body Measurements you might find that the chest, waist and shoulder width, hips and height of your recipient do not match a single size on the chart.  For instance, his chest measurement may suit our size M, his waist may be size M, his shoulders size S and his hips size L…and then his height might match 4XL…it’s certainly possible to have these results!  In a scenario like this, the chest measurement is the most important since this is where the raglan is most fitted and where it is the most difficult to adjust.

Choose our size M pattern but then manipulate it to ensure it matches the recipient’s shoulders, hips and height.  This isn’t as tricky as it might sound!  Here is how I suggest you approach this particular scenario:

Choose a shirt size-16

Accounting for size S shoulders: You can simply sew with slightly larger seam allowances when attaching the sleeves to take in a bit of extra fabric at the shoulders (use a larger seam allowance for the sleeve but not for the body since you don’t want the body to be any smaller at the chest).  Always make smaller changes than you think you need since you can remove more fabric but you can’t easily add fabric back in once seam allowances are trimmed!

Choose a shirt size-13

Accounting for size L hips: Before cutting out your fabric, grade to a larger size at the hips to suit your wearer.  Here is a tutorial I made for the Jedediah Pants to show you how to grade between sizes.  Alternatively, you can just taper to a smaller seam allowance as you sew down the side seam towards the hem.

Accounting for size 4XL height:  This is a big change that you will need to do before cutting out your fabric since you will be adding lots of length to the pattern pieces.  Slice along the lengthen and shorten here lines and follow our tutorial on lengthening a pattern.  You might like to double check a t-shirt that your wearer likes to see exactly how much length to add to the Sayward (measure the Centre Back Length as I describe in the instruction booklet).  Perhaps he likes a t-shirt longer or shorter than the Sayward is designed to fit…so don’t just rely on his height!  Refer to the Garment Measurement chart too!


So now we’ve covered how to use our measurement charts and adjust the Sayward Raglan for fit, please stay tuned for tomorrow’s special guest post.  It will be about grading to a larger (or smaller) size than our pattern offers – perfect for men who fall just outside of our available size range but would still love a Sayward Raglan!


 

Fun Pattern Hacks:

Henley raglan

Okay, let’s move on to adjusting the Sayward Raglan to suit style preferences.  This is the fun part!  I’ll be covering how to create 3/4 length sleeves and how to add a Henley placket.

Add 3/4 Length Sleeves to the Sayward Raglan

 

 

This is an easy adjustment to create a very classic look.  Before cutting out your fabric, bring out your Sleeve pattern piece (the long sleeve version).

Measure your recipient’s arm to find out exactly where he would like his 3/4 length sleeve to end.  Measure along the seam from underarm to the desired finished length. Ensure that his elbow is ever so slightly bent as it would be when he is standing relaxed.

Sayward-Raglan-pattern-hack-1

Remember that the Sleeve pattern piece includes 1.5 cm (5/8″) seam allowances.  Whenever you manipulate pattern pieces, it is most accurate to mark in your actual seamlines – do this now along all edges by measuring in 1.5 cm (5/8″) at various points and then connecting the dots.

Sayward-Raglan-pattern-hack-2.jpg

Measure from the underarm seamline down the arm to your desired length.  Draw a horizontal line at this point – this is your new finished hem length.

 

Now it is time to add the hem allowance.  You will notice on the original pattern piece that the hem allowances features an angle.  This angle adds width to the bottom of the hem so when you fold up the hem it will match the taper of the sleeve.  We need to replicate this at our new hemline.

Sayward-Raglan-pattern-hack-3

Hold up your sleeve pattern piece to a window (tape it there so it does not shift).  Place another piece of paper over the 3/4 length horizontal line.  Measure up from the line 2.5 cm (1″).  Trace the angled line.

Sayward-Raglan-pattern-hack-4

Flip your piece of paper over and slip it under the Sleeve pattern piece.  Use the light from the window to trace the angled hem onto the original pattern.  Add the seam allowance back on to each side of the hem allowance (the outer red lines in the diagram above).

Cut off the extra sleeve length that you no longer need.

Now you can cut out your 3/4 length sleeve and sew it up exactly as per the instructions!

Add a Henley Placket to the Sayward Raglan

Resized 0007

First of all, you will need to download a placket pattern piece – Free Placket Sewing Pattern!  It creates the same style of placket that you see on our Strathcona Henley.  Print it full size with no scaling and check it is the correct size by measuring the 3″ test square.

 

Now, using the Sayward Front pattern piece, draw a vertical line at center front of the neckline measuring 13.7 cm long (5 7/16″).  This is where you will position your placket.

Head to our tutorial on sewing a Henley placket.

Once your placket is complete, attach the Neck Band as follows (this is an excerpt from our Strathcona Henley instruction booklet.  Be sure to open the image in a new tab to view it full size):

Sew the Sayward with a Henley Placket

And there you have it!  Our classic Sayward Raglan turned in to a versatile Henley like this perfect example from The Gap!

Raglan Henley


 

You are now ready to cut out your fabric.  I have a VERY detailed post on cutting out a t-shirt – while I used the Strathcona Henley pattern for this tutorial, everything I mention applies perfectly to our Sayward Raglan.

Stay tuned for our guest post on grading tomorrow and I will be back for the final sew-along post on Wednesday when we will be sewing the Sayward!

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